Khor Virap

3-4 hours

Duration: 3-4 hours (including transfers)
Distance: 60 km one way
Entrance ticket: Not applicable
Local guides on spot: Not necessary
Price for 2-4 pax: by Mercedes VITO (5 seats) =AMD equivalent to USD 190 (including guide service)
Price for 5-12 pax: by Mercedes Sprinter (17 seats) = AMD equivalent to USD 210 (including guide service)
Price for 12 pax and more: By buses (25 seats and more) = AMD equivalent to USD 310 (including guide service)

Tour description: Tour to Khor Virap Monastery- meaning deep pit. Khor Virap is significant in Armenian history because it is where Saint Gregory the Illuminator (the patron-saint of Armenia) was imprisoned in a deep dungeon for 13 years by the then pagan Armenian King Trdat III. According to an Armenian legend, the King contracted a vile disease turning him into a wild boar. After releasing Saint Gregory from the dungeon, the King was healed by Saint Gregory and converted him to Christianity in 301 AD, making Armenia the first country to adopt Christianity as its state religion.

Khor VirapKhor Virap Monastery

This tour can ideally be combined with:

City tour
Visit to Garni and Geghard
Visit to Echmiadzin

Extension to Noravank:

Duration: 1 hour (from Khor Virap)
Distance: ~70 km one way (from Khor Virap)
Entrance ticket: Not applicable
Local guides on spot: Not necessary
Price for 2-4 pax: by Mercedes VITO (5 seats) = supplement AMD equivalent to USD 50 (per car)
Price for 5-12 pax: by Mercedes Sprinter (17 seats) = supplement AMD equivalent to USD 60 (per car)
Price for 12 pax and more: By buses (25 seats and more) = supplement AMD equivalent to USD 100 (per car)

Tour description: Noravank (meaning “New Monastery” in Armenian) is a 13th century Armenian Apostolic Church monastery, located 122 km from Yerevan in a narrow gorge made by the Amaghu river, nearby the city of Yeghegnadzor. The gorge is known for its tall, sheer, brick-red cliffs, directly across the monastery. The monastery is best known for its two-storey S. Astvatsatsin church, which grants access to the second floor by way of narrow stones jutting out from the face of building. The monastery is sometimes called Amaghu-Noravank, Amaghu being the name of a small recently destroyed village above the canyon, in order to distinguish it from Bgheno-Noravank, near Goris. In the 13th–14th centuries the monastery became a residence of Syunik’s bishops, consequentl, a major religious and, later, cultural center of Armenia closely connected with many of the local seats of learning, especially with Gladzor’s famed university and library.

Noravank MonasteryNoravank Monastery

 

 

 

Send an enquiry

WEATHER

FACEBOOK

EXCHANGE RATES